On-Demand Version of Coursera Metaliteracy MOOC Launches in December 2016!

We are set to launch an on-demand version of our Cousera Metaliteracy MOOC entitled Metaliteracy: Empowering Yourself in a Connected World in December 2016! If you missed this MOOC the first time around or would like to discover this course for your own learning or as a resource for instruction, register now for this on-demand version taught by  Tom Mackey, Trudi Jacobson, Kelsey O’Brien, Michele Forte, and Allyson Kaczmarek.  This course will provide a dynamic exploration of metaliteracy through videos, animations, interviews, readings, and digital images, all developed by members of the metaliteracy learning collaborative from two schools within the State University of New York (SUNY), The University at Albany and Empire State College. Learners will participate in peer assessments and contribute to online discussions related to such topics as the metaliteracy model, creating and sharing information, understanding intellectual property and the ethical use of information, understanding how information is packaged and shared, participating as a global contributor, creating and curating information, and developing metacognitive reflection.  While this course is focused primarily on metaliteracy, learners and teachers should also explore this MOOC as a way to support information literacy and related literacies such as digital literacy and media literacy.  Register now for our December launch. Special thanks to Kelsey O’Brien for working closely with Coursera and our UAlbany/ESC team to transition the first version of this course into the on-demand format!

 

New Metaliteracy Keynotes in June 2016!

Tom Mackey and Trudi Jacobson both presented on metaliteracy in June at two separate keynote presentations during the same week! Tom presented Developing Metaliteracy to Engage Citizens in a Connected World at the University of Delaware Summer Faculty Institute 2016 and Trudi presented Envisioning the Possibilities: Educational Trends and Information Literacy in Academic Libraries at the 3er Congreso de Bibliotecas Universitarias y Especializadas in Santiago, Chile! Trudi’s presentation also considered new modes and methods of teaching (including digital badges and MOOCs) and the ACRL Framework. Trudi’s slides are available via SlideShare. Tom’s keynote is available online at the SFI 2016 Sessions Recording Page and his slides are available via SlideShare and this blog posting.

Metaliteracy in Practice Book Published!

MackeyMIP_300We are thrilled that our new edited book Metaliteracy in Practice (right) was published this week by ALA Neal-Schuman! This book is the follow up to our co-authored book Metaliteracy: Reinventing Information Literacy to Empower Learners (2014).  The new book features 9 chapters from faculty and librarians who have been applying metaliteracy in their teaching practices.  We really enjoyed the chance to work with such outstanding chapter authors on this project, representing a variety of institutions, including: Keene State College, Washington College, University of South Africa, SUNY College at Brockport, and the University of Scranton. The authors explore metaliteracy practices related to social media pedagogy, the politics of information, nursing education, open and collaborative learning, student empowerment, and learner agency.  In addition, ACRL’s Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education is examined in relation to metaliteracy in several of the chapters.  The book’s Foreword was written by Alison J. Head, Ph.D., Executive Director, Project Information Literacy (PIL), Principal Research Scientist, The Information School, University of Washington, and Faculty Associate, Berkman Center for Internet & Society, Harvard University. We appreciate all of the support we received from everyone at ALA Neal-Schuman and we must say that we absolutely love the cover!  -Trudi and Tom

Metaliteracy Keynote at Cedar Crest College

We were thrilled to present on the topic Expanding Metaliteracy Across the Curriculum to Advance Lifelong Civic Engagement at Cedar Crest College last week! The Cedar Crest Curriculum Committee invited us to present a summer workshop to build on the great work they are doing to map information literacy/metaliteracy across the curriculum.  We were very impressed with the work they are doing and enjoyed our time with the faculty, librarians, and administrators very much.  This is the slide deck for the facilitated presentation and it includes the world premiere of our new book cover for the forthcoming Metaliteracy in Practice! Be sure to check it out!

Metaliteracy featured at Cedar Crest College Summer Workshop

We are looking forward to presenting at Cedar Crest College in Allentown, Pennsylvania on Wednesday August 19.  The topic of our collaborative workshop will be: Expanding Metaliteracy Across the Curriculum to Advance Lifelong Civic Engagement.  Here’s the description for what we plan to do:

Metaliteracy is a reinvention of information literacy to promote reflective learning, active and critical participation in social settings, including social media, and the ability to adapt to emerging technologies. This is a dynamic reframing of information literacy with an expanded set of learning goals and objectives that could be applied across the curriculum to support metacognitive reflection, and learners as informed consumers and collaborative producers of information. Metaliteracy has influenced the development of the new Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education, signaling wider support for this model and increasing adoption in diverse educational settings. Metaliteracy has sparked the development of several collaborative projects initiated by Mackey and Jacobson and their colleagues in the Metaliteracy Learning Collaborative, including a digital badging system and three Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs).

Metaliterate learners, who apply integrated competencies related to evaluating, consuming, and producing information in participatory environments, will be better prepared for college level learning and lifelong civic engagement. This workshop will define metaliteracy, discuss the four domains of metaliteracy and related learning goals and objectives, and examine how this approach has been applied in the curricular design of several innovative projects such as competency based digital badging and three MOOCs. Participants will have a chance during the workshop to envisage opportunities to enhance students’ metaliteracy abilities, and to share these ideas with other attendees.

One of the presenters for this workshop, Trudi E. Jacobson, was co-chair of the ACRL Task Force with Craig Gibson (The Ohio State University). She will describe the new metaliteracy-informed ACRL Framework and its definition of information literacy. This interactive portion of the workshop will be an opportunity to engage with the Framework and consider how it might inform collaborations between disciplinary faculty members and librarians. We will provide an opportunity for participants to grapple with more easily implemented changes and the metaliteracy underpinnings of the frame content to really build upon the content examined throughout the day.

Sneak Peak #2 into Metaliteracy in Practice

As promised, we are posting chapter previews, written by the authors, for the forthcoming book Metaliteracy in Practice, due out in late 2015 or early 2016 from ALA Neal-Schuman.

Chapter 2:

The Politics of Information: Students as Creators in a Metaliteracy Context

Lauren Wallis, Christopher Newport University

Andrew Battista, New York University

The recent revision of the Framework for Information Literacy in Higher Education opens a space for students to reflect on their position within an inherently political imbroglio of information, both in traditional scholarly formats and in open online spaces. When students visit the library, it is often at the behest of their professors, who expect that librarians will tell them how to find peer-reviewed journals. Meanwhile, the Framework, with its grounding in metaliteracy, encourages knowledge practices and dispositions in which students see their own encounters with information as opportunities to question authority, challenge expertise, and recognize the merit of nontraditional forms of evidence.

As the Framework was being revised, and as discussions of metaliteracy as a guiding principle for information literacy pedagogy emerged, we taught a one-credit class called The Politics of Information. In this class, we asked several questions: Who creates information? What information gets produced and circulated, and what information does not?  Who has access to information, and how can the dissemination of information be an instrument of social control, inside and outside of the academy? As we taught, we realized that our core teaching moves—to destabilize authority and to encourage students to create digital products and reflect metacognitively on their learning experience—dovetail with the goals of metaliteracy.

We are excited that our chapter, “The Politics of Information: Students as Creators in a Metaliteracy Context,” is included in the forthcoming Metaliteracy in Practice volume. Our chapter makes the connections between the learning outcomes in The Politics of Information course and metaliteracy explicit. We began with the idea that information is a social construct, not a static, amorphous entity that reifies academic authority. We hope that this chapter, along with the others in the volume, offers concrete ways to adopt the goals of metaliteracy into the information literacy classroom.

Sneak Peaks into the Forthcoming Book Metaliteracy in Practice

As we mentioned in our post of June 14, the manuscript of Metaliteracy in Practice has been delivered to our editors, ALA Neal-Schuman, with publication expected in late 2015 or early 2016. The volume includes nine chapters, whose authors explore a wide range of teaching situations and opportunities where metaliteracy provides a structural and pedagogical framework.

We thought that brief overviews of some of the content might interest you.  Over the next month or two we will feature these sneak peaks, written by chapter authors, as blog posts. We hope they will whet your appetite!

Chapter 4:

Where Collections and Metaliteracy Meet: Incorporating Library-Owned Platforms into Open and Collaborative Library Instruction

Amanda Scull

Keene State College, New Hampshire

Many of the ways in which librarians provide instruction are dependent upon libraries’ subscription content, namely databases and online journals. Yet in a time when our budgets are decreasing and the cost of those resources increases annually, librarians should consider shifting their focus to library-owned platforms that support local content creation. This focus on institutionally created content housed on library platforms requires a shift in the way we define “collections.” However, this approach allows librarians to innovate and adapt their instruction in ways that engage students with collaboration, varied content, and the literacies demanded of today’s scholars and workforce.

This chapter focuses on the use of institutional repositories and LibGuides as two platforms through which librarians can both teach and develop content. There are many ways to connect the metaliteracy objectives to instruction through these platforms, as they are ideal places for encouraging students to collaborate and participate in the scholarly conversation. Practical examples of how librarians are already using these platforms at colleges and universities are provided, as well as suggestions for assessment and mapping to the metaliteracy goals and objectives and ACRL’s Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education.