Another Metaliteracy open learning opportunity is about to begin

In fall 2013 the Metaliteracy Learning Collaborative hosted a connectivist MOOC, Metaliteracy MOOC, which provided a collaborative learning environment to explore a range of aspects connected with metaliteracy. Over 500 people registered for the course, primarily professionals from information-related fields.

We are delighted to announce that this spring we will offer not one but two x-MOOCs, one on Coursera and one on Canvas. First up is the Coursera MOOC: Metaliteracy: Empowering Yourself in a Connected World. Registration for this first MOOC is now open at and the 10-week course will be begin on February 2, 2015. The second MOOC is being developed in Canvas Network with a particular emphasis on Digital Citizenship and additional details about registration will be forthcoming. These MOOCs are open to all, but we expect that many people who are not information professionals will engage in learning about their active roles in our information age, and how they can contribute to these social spaces as informed digital citizens.  While our original connectivist MOOC was focused on exploring the theory of metaliteracy from multiple perspectives through our collaborative MOOC Talks, both X-MOOCs are designed for learners interested in putting theory into practice through an integrated and collaborative learning experience.

The two new metaliteracy MOOCs are being supported by an Innovative Instruction Technology Grant (IITG) Designing Innovative Online Learning: Integrating a Coursera MOOC with Open SUNY Badging.  Both MOOCs integrate content from our Metaliteracy Digital Badging system and the Canvas Network version will provide opportunities for learners to earn a sharable Digital Citizen badge.

Register now for Empowering Yourself in a Connected World!  Look forward to seeing you in the open course!

Metaliteracy Presentation Videos Now Available via ESC-TV

As part of our SUNY wide Conversations in the Disciplines event hosted at Empire State College, we recorded the keynote presentations and panels. These videos are now available via ESC-TV and include the morning keynote presentation by Tom Mackey and Trudi Jacobson, entitled Developing Metaliterate Learners: Transforming Literacy Across Disciplines.  We also feature the morning Reaction Panel with Richard Fogarty, Carleen Huxley, and Michael Youngs.  The afternoon sessions are also available, including the keynote presentation by Randy B. Hensley and Reaction Panel: Brian Morgan, Paige Jaeger, Tor Loney, Karen Mahar, Dave Brown, and Ashley Smolinski.  All of the videos are available at Metaliteracy Conference 2013.

Conversations in the Disciplines

Last week we participated in a SUNY-wide “Conversations in the Disciplines” focused on metaliteracy.  This is a competitive program that provides funding for a one-day conference to promote interactivity and dialogue.  We experienced a full-day of activity that examined many dimensions of metaliteracy and covered a range of issues from K-12 to higher education to open learning.  This is the PowerPoint presentation from our morning keynote “Developing Metaliterate Learners: Transforming Literacy across Disciplines.”  

Meta or MEGA literacy!

Metaliteracy has been featured recently in two new publications.  A new UNESCO document entitled Media and Information Literacy for Knowledge Societies (2013) provides a brief definition of metaliteracy and makes it central to the conclusion.  According to this new publication:

As an umbrella term, it covers many of the other literacies. It also seems to overlap with new literacies such as multiliteracies and global literacy. It is a metaliteracy. It is transversal in its nature and can be seen as an iceberg concept which is much bigger than what it is seen at first sight. Information literacy can be easily called a megaliteracy which is composed of many other skills and literacies (p. 85).

As a comprehensive and unifying metaliteracy, the idea of a megaliteracy is not needed, since the the meta already encompasses this idea.  But this is an intriguing way to look at it and certainly addresses the interconnected nature of emerging literacies.  Great to see metaliteracy brought into the conversation.

We also note another new publication from Betty Hurley-Dasgupta, Carol Yeager, and Catherine Bliss from SUNY Empire State College about the first MOOC they offered in the SUNY System entitled Creativity and Multicultural Communication.  The authors make several references to metaliteracy in their article cMOOC and Global Learning: An Authentic Alternative in The Journal of Asynchronous Learning Networks (JALN).  According to the authors,

Clearly, we need to scaffold the development of metaliteracy skills for learning through cMOOCs. Some scaffolding could be accomplished by incorporating more self-assessment into the MOOC. For future MOOCs, we plan to incorporate shared rubrics to help participants assess their own metaliteracy skills, (Yeager,, 2013, p. 144).

This is an important point that demonstrates the potential impact of a metaliteracy perspective on the cMOOC learning experience, and how learners could gain new insights and knowledge in these open and collaborative spaces.  We definitely need metaliteracy rubrics for MOOCs to enhance the experience for independent and collaborative learners.