Metaliterate 9th-Grade Learners Take a Stand Against Misinformation

A recent panel presentation by the Metaliteracy Learning Collaborative supports students in a Pathways in Technology (PTECH) Early College High School who are working on a Public Service Announcement (PSA) project related to misinformation. If you are interested in applying metaliteracy to your teaching practices, check out this interactive presentation and associated breakout sessions entitled Metaliterate Learners Take a Stand Against Misinformation. This model for applying metaliteracy in a problem-based learning scenario was developed by Tom Mackey from SUNY Empire State College, in collaboration with Trudi Jacobson, and Kelsey O’Brien from the University at Albany. Sandra Barkevich, Business and Career Explorations Instructor at HFM Pathways in Technology Early College High School (PTECH) invited the Metaliteracy Learning Collaborative to develop this interactive presentation. During this session, metaliteracy was introduced to reinforce the learner as producer role that the students take on as collaborative creators of PSA’s about misinformation.

During this session, the students and teachers were introduced to the core components of metaliteracy (roles, domains, characteristics, goals and learning objectives) and were then organized into three different breakout sessions. The organization of the breakouts was based on three of the components (roles, characteristics, goals and learning objectives). Members of each group also engaged with the learning domains as they thought about next steps for their project, what would be required of them, and how awareness of these domains might be used to enhance both their learning and their work. The students applied what they learned about these metaliteracy principles during the small group activities which included interactive surveys and an interactive padlet where each group shared one big takeaway.

We really enjoyed working with the 9th graders as they engaged with these metaliteracy ideas and look forward to the development of their PSAs! If you have any questions about this presentation and how to apply it to your pre-college or higher education setting, feel free to reach out to us at any time!

Tom, Trudi, & Kelsey

Metaliteracy Keynote at Virtual Teaching with Technology Showcase on April 24

The Annual Teaching with Technology Showcase: Excellence in Action, an entirely online event, will feature an invited keynote by Trudi Jacobson and Tom Mackey about metaliteracy on Friday, April 24. The keynote entitled Teaching Metaliteracy as a Vital Literacy for Today’s Digital World will explore metaliteracy and its relevance to educators and students, especially during this time of the COVID-19 crisis, when the ability to produce and share truthful and trusted information is essential. The keynote will examine metacognitive reflection and self-regulation as part of the scaffolding that metaliteracy provides for successful student participation in open pedagogical settings. Several open digital learning projects produced by the Metaliteracy Learning Collaborative will be introduced as part of this interactive presentation.

Roles of the Metaliterate Learner Figure (Mackey & Jacobson, 2014)

Registration is open for this virtual conference that is sponsored by Edge, the regional technology partner for colleges and universities in New Jersey. Edge responded quickly to the COVID-19 crisis and moved this conference to an entirely online format and will pilot the Run the World platform as part of this transition.

The conference starts at 9:30am with opening remarks by Nancy Zimmerman, Executive Director for EdgeEvents and Print Communications. Trudi and Tom’s keynote address is at 11:45 am. Throughout the day, presenters will address such relevant topics as: promoting the adoption of technology by faculty, video games for learning, technology preferences of Generation Z college students, virtual experiences in art and science, creating OER initiatives, interactive polling, using makerspaces in college, applying augmented reality and gamification to deepen learning, and much more!

We look forward to seeing you at the virtual conference and will share our slides after our keynote!

-Tom & Trudi

BiblioVerifica Blog Response to Metaliteracy Post-Truth MOOC

We welcome this guest posting from Damiano Orrù, librarian at Vilfredo Pareto Library School of Economics at the University of Rome “Tor Vergata,” Italy. We met Damiano at the Conference on Learning Information Literacy across the Globe in Frankfurt, Germany in May 2019 and he has since completed our Metaliteracy MOOC Empowering Yourself in a Post-Truth World. He wrote this post in response to the Coursera MOOC as part of his own BiblioVerifica blog. Thanks to Damiano for completing our MOOC and providing these excellent resources!

BiblioVerifica Blog for Fact-checking by Citizens

Damiano Orrù, librarian at Vilfredo Pareto Library
School of Economics,  University of Rome “Tor Vergata”,  Italy

As a Coursera MOOC student, I completed the course “Empowering Yourself in a Post-Truth World” in 6 weeks, deepening the themes of disinformation and verification of facts and news.

All these contents and tools are useful to teach “how to spot fake news”[1] by the cognitive and behavioral domanins of Metaliteracy.  The cognitive domain of the Metaliterate Learner is important to understand information and news, analyzing sources and contexts. The behavioral domain is essential for a conscious sharing and production of content through chat, social media, e-mail, forums, blogs. Several Metaliteracy practices are excellent tools for empowering citizens to use critical thinking and to evaluate sources.

The BiblioVerifica[2] blog aims to support citizens (not just students) in the autonomous practice of fact-checking, based on open access and open data resources.  Currently, this idea embraces dissemination of open data and open access content for all fact-checkers citizens by eight librarians as editorial staff[3]BiblioVerifica blog has developed a network of stakeholders in the library and school environment since 2017. For the future our intiative may involve teachers and librarians to develop and share open education oriented fact-chekcing practices and tools. This free digital reference activity will engage citizens and schools in Italy.  

The blog engaged citizenzs also by serious gamification app: BiblioVerifica Olympics[4] a contest based on 15 multiple choice quizzes, open to all citzens, for self assesment, available for free, without money prize or sponsor. In 2018 the first olympics quizzes covered the topics of reliable sources, verification strategies, research tools, etc…  The second edition covered the topics of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)[5] in the current year.  For the future may improve this tool for engage learners by Metaliteracy contents or debunking practices. 

Around European countries BiblioVerifica blog launched CrowdSearcher[6], an international platform supporting the European policy Tackling online disinformation[7] by open education resources, open contents, open data.

In the next weeks the BiblioVerifica bloggers will continue to support European citizens, also suggesting Metaliteracy’s tools, so useful, almost indispensable, to create tutorial and videos, serious games and infographics about media and information literacy.

This media and information literacy against misinformation is disseminated by librarians, without sponsor, without remuneration for posts or tutorial, by “BiblioVolontari“. As librarians the bloggers stick to IFLA Code of Ethics for Librarians and other Information Workers[8]:
a) access to information
b) open access and intellectual property
c) neutrality, personal integrity and professional skills

BiblioVerifica blog is open to all volunteer librarians around the world, fostering critical thinking, analysing personal BIAS, suggesting reliable sources, fighting propaganda and misinformation by empowering citizens in a Post-Truth World!

[1] https://www.ifla.org/publications/node/11174

[2] http://biblioverifica.altervista.org/

[3] http://biblioverifica.altervista.org/bibliovolontari/

[4] http://biblioverifica.altervista.org/olympics/

[5] https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/?menu=1300

[6] http://crowdsearcher.altervista.org/

[7] https://ec.europa.eu/digital-single-market/en/tackling-online-disinformation

[8] https://www.ifla.org/publications/node/11092

orru@economia.uniroma2.it 
http://orcid.org/0000-0002-7493-5648 
https://linkedin.com/in/orrudamiano
Rome, October 27th 2019

New Metaliteracy Keynotes in June 2016!

Tom Mackey and Trudi Jacobson both presented on metaliteracy in June at two separate keynote presentations during the same week! Tom presented Developing Metaliteracy to Engage Citizens in a Connected World at the University of Delaware Summer Faculty Institute 2016 and Trudi presented Envisioning the Possibilities: Educational Trends and Information Literacy in Academic Libraries at the 3er Congreso de Bibliotecas Universitarias y Especializadas in Santiago, Chile! Trudi’s presentation also considered new modes and methods of teaching (including digital badges and MOOCs) and the ACRL Framework. Trudi’s slides are available via SlideShare. Tom’s keynote is available online at the SFI 2016 Sessions Recording Page and his slides are available via SlideShare and this blog posting.

Sneak Peaks into the Forthcoming Book Metaliteracy in Practice

As we mentioned in our post of June 14, the manuscript of Metaliteracy in Practice has been delivered to our editors, ALA Neal-Schuman, with publication expected in late 2015 or early 2016. The volume includes nine chapters, whose authors explore a wide range of teaching situations and opportunities where metaliteracy provides a structural and pedagogical framework.

We thought that brief overviews of some of the content might interest you.  Over the next month or two we will feature these sneak peaks, written by chapter authors, as blog posts. We hope they will whet your appetite!

Chapter 4:

Where Collections and Metaliteracy Meet: Incorporating Library-Owned Platforms into Open and Collaborative Library Instruction

Amanda Scull

Keene State College, New Hampshire

Many of the ways in which librarians provide instruction are dependent upon libraries’ subscription content, namely databases and online journals. Yet in a time when our budgets are decreasing and the cost of those resources increases annually, librarians should consider shifting their focus to library-owned platforms that support local content creation. This focus on institutionally created content housed on library platforms requires a shift in the way we define “collections.” However, this approach allows librarians to innovate and adapt their instruction in ways that engage students with collaboration, varied content, and the literacies demanded of today’s scholars and workforce.

This chapter focuses on the use of institutional repositories and LibGuides as two platforms through which librarians can both teach and develop content. There are many ways to connect the metaliteracy objectives to instruction through these platforms, as they are ideal places for encouraging students to collaborate and participate in the scholarly conversation. Practical examples of how librarians are already using these platforms at colleges and universities are provided, as well as suggestions for assessment and mapping to the metaliteracy goals and objectives and ACRL’s Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education.

Finished Manuscript of Metaliteracy in Practice

We have spent the last year editing a book that we just sent to our publishers, ALA Editions, at the beginning of July. Entitled Metaliteracy in Practice, the chapter authors explore a wide range of teaching situations and opportunities where metaliteracy provides a structural and pedagogical framework. It is highly exciting and inspirational to learn about the numerous ways the authors have found metaliteracy to be meaningful to them and their students.

The authors also examine issues relevant to the ACRL Framework in relation to metaliteracy. Both are having a transformative effect on the field of information literacy. The chapter authors show why we need to reframe and reinvent information literacy as a metaliteracy and why a new definition of information literacy was required at this pivotal time in higher education.

In addition to our wonderful chapter authors, we are thrilled that the book’s Foreword has been written by Alison J. Head, Ph.D., Executive Director, Project Information Literacy (PIL), Principal Research Scientist, The Information School, University of Washington, and Faculty Associate, Berkman Center for Internet & Society, Harvard University. Alison provides the ideal context for the book that connects to her innovative work with Project Information Literacy (PIL).

We expect the book will be published in late 2015 or early 2016. As soon as the publisher finalizes the copy for their catalog, we’ll add it here.

In the meantime, look for upcoming posts by chapter authors that provide a glimpse into the book’s contents!