Metaliteracy Keynote Now Online

The recent metaliteracy presentation entitled Metaliteracy as an Empowering Model for Teaching Mobile and Social Learners by Tom Mackey and Trudi Jacobson for an audience at the University of Puerto Rico is now available online. In addition to the PowerPoint slides below, the second half of the presentation was recorded and is available for view via ZOOM in video and audio formats. Thanks to the wonderful audience that participated in this conversation and asked excellent questions!

Metaliteracy Featured at the University of Puerto Rico’s Mobile Learning Week Event

Metaliteracy 2Tom Mackey and Trudi Jacobson have been invited to present a collaborative keynote on metaliteracy at The University of Puerto Rico’s Mobile Learning Week event on Monday, March 20 at 10am eastern time. In a presentation entitled “Metaliteracy as an Empowering Model for Teaching Mobile and Social Learners,” Tom and Trudi will explore the theory of metaliteracy while illustrating practical applications that can be applied in a variety of teaching and learning situations. In today’s mobile media environments our learners are continuously engaged with information in a variety of forms using a range of technologies. Learners from around the world are texting, posting, and sharing documents they find online through a multitude of social media spaces and mobile devices. But how much of this information can be trusted? Do learners know how to differentiate between what is real and what is fake in these environments? And do learners fully appreciate the importance of critical thinking and contributing as active and original producers of information, beyond posting selfies via mobile phones? How do learners bridge their free-flowing access to information via social media and mobile devices with the academic resources available in the library? How do learners make meaning from these different sources of information to advance their participatory roles as researchers and scholars? Metaliteracy is a model for understanding how information is produced and shared collaboratively in networked social spaces. The metaliterate learner is metacognitive, a critical consumer of information and an informed producer of digital media. The metaliterate learner adapts to changing technologies and always brings a critical and reflective sensibility to these experiences, asking good questions and being open to multiple perspectives.

Our approach to metaliteracy in practice is informed by several projects developed by the Metaliteracy Learning Collaborative, including a competency-based digital badging system and three Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs). This presentation will examine the Metaliteracy Learning Goals and Objectives that inform these projects as a flexible, adaptable, and evolving resource. In addition, the Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL) Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education will be introduced and explained. The information environment that compels us to move beyond the Standards is the one that spurred our development of metaliteracy. Indeed, one of the underpinning elements of the Framework is metaliteracy. This connection, as well as the threshold concept structure, will be explored in detail.

We appreciate the invitation to present from Ana I. Medina Hernández, MIS, Coordinadora Red Graduada, Decanato de Estudios Graduados e Investigación and Rossana I. Barrios Llorens, MIS, CLA, Head Librarian Serials and e-Access Department, Conrado F. Asenjo Library, University of Puerto Rico Medical Sciences Campus.

Metaliteracy Takes On Fake News

In an essay for The Conversation, entitled How we can learn to reject fake news in the digital world? Tom Mackey and Trudi Jacobson describe ways to challenge fake news through metaliteracy. The spread of fake news across social media presents us all with a reality check about the danger of deception in these spaces. As the authors describe in the article, fake news stories that appear to be easily accepted by online users is a problem that warrants a strong educational response through focused metaliterate teaching and learning. The same approaches outlined in the article address concerns about misinformation that is created and shared online as well. Several of metaliteracy’s learning goals and objectives speak directly to the situation we find ourselves in with a proliferation of fake news and misinformation online.

The response to the essay has been tremendous, leading to an interview with Tom and Trudi by reporter Torie Wells from 6CBSNews for the TV news story Facebook preparing to flag fake news stories. According to stats provided by The Conversation, the article has had over 7,000 readers to date, with 796 Facebook shares, 115 tweets, and 143 shares via LinkedIn. The article has been published by the Associated Press, Government Technology, and newspapers across the country, including the Albany Times Union, Houston Chronicle, SFGate, and Seattle Post-Intelligencer, among others.

Last year, Jacobson and Mackey wrote an article for The Conversation about how to protect ourselves online from those annoying ads that follow us around while surfing the Web. The authors said that becoming meta-literate in today’s social media world prepares us to think critically about the sites we visit online and to develop smart search strategies that protect our identity. This latest piece about fake news is an extension of that work, applying metaliteracy to real world practice.

On-Demand Version of Coursera Metaliteracy MOOC Launches in December 2016!

We are set to launch an on-demand version of our Cousera Metaliteracy MOOC entitled Metaliteracy: Empowering Yourself in a Connected World in December 2016! If you missed this MOOC the first time around or would like to discover this course for your own learning or as a resource for instruction, register now for this on-demand version taught by  Tom Mackey, Trudi Jacobson, Kelsey O’Brien, Michele Forte, and Allyson Kaczmarek.  This course will provide a dynamic exploration of metaliteracy through videos, animations, interviews, readings, and digital images, all developed by members of the metaliteracy learning collaborative from two schools within the State University of New York (SUNY), The University at Albany and Empire State College. Learners will participate in peer assessments and contribute to online discussions related to such topics as the metaliteracy model, creating and sharing information, understanding intellectual property and the ethical use of information, understanding how information is packaged and shared, participating as a global contributor, creating and curating information, and developing metacognitive reflection.  While this course is focused primarily on metaliteracy, learners and teachers should also explore this MOOC as a way to support information literacy and related literacies such as digital literacy and media literacy.  Register now for our December launch. Special thanks to Kelsey O’Brien for working closely with Coursera and our UAlbany/ESC team to transition the first version of this course into the on-demand format!

 

Metaliteracy in Practice Book Published!

MackeyMIP_300We are thrilled that our new edited book Metaliteracy in Practice (right) was published this week by ALA Neal-Schuman! This book is the follow up to our co-authored book Metaliteracy: Reinventing Information Literacy to Empower Learners (2014).  The new book features 9 chapters from faculty and librarians who have been applying metaliteracy in their teaching practices.  We really enjoyed the chance to work with such outstanding chapter authors on this project, representing a variety of institutions, including: Keene State College, Washington College, University of South Africa, SUNY College at Brockport, and the University of Scranton. The authors explore metaliteracy practices related to social media pedagogy, the politics of information, nursing education, open and collaborative learning, student empowerment, and learner agency.  In addition, ACRL’s Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education is examined in relation to metaliteracy in several of the chapters.  The book’s Foreword was written by Alison J. Head, Ph.D., Executive Director, Project Information Literacy (PIL), Principal Research Scientist, The Information School, University of Washington, and Faculty Associate, Berkman Center for Internet & Society, Harvard University. We appreciate all of the support we received from everyone at ALA Neal-Schuman and we must say that we absolutely love the cover!  -Trudi and Tom

Metaliteracy in Practice: Sneak Peak #3

Barbara J. D’Angelo and Barry M. Maid of Arizona State University give you a glimpse into their chapter in the forthcoming book.

Metaliteracy Learning of RN to BSN Students: A Fusion of Disciplinary Values and Discourses

Library and Information Science and Writing Studies share a long-standing collaborative partnership in higher education. The connection often is articulated or manifested in first year composition courses, particularly the second semester composition course focused on research (commonly known as English 102 or Composition II). However, research and communication, including written communication, also are important to disciplinary discourses. Nurses, in particular, exist within sophisticated information environments in which work takes place in interdisciplinary teams ranging from medical personnel, pharmacists, home health care workers, social workers, patients, and more. For undergraduate nursing education, the importance of research and communication practices can be seen in two of nursing’s disciplinary documents related to undergraduate education: The Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice and in Core Competencies for Interprofessional Collaboration.

In this chapter we report on the development of a discipline-specific writing and research course, Writing for Healthcare Management, for nursing majors in the online RN-BSN degree program at Arizona State University. The course focuses on developing students’ professional writing and information abilities in a way that reflects concepts underpinning metaliteracy. The course facilitates critical thinking and collaborative practices needed for both the consumption and production of knowledge. The chapter describes the development of the course and assignments, and how metaliteracy aligns with disciplinary writing outcomes. In addition, the results of a small scale study that analyzed student work is presented to show how the course meets metaliteracy goals and learning objectives. The chapter contributes an example of a “meta” approach to course design and a model of a contextual approach to fusing multiple “literacies” and “outcomes or objectives” through valuing shared responsibility and accountability for student achievement and transfer of knowledge. While this chapter concentrates on a course in one discipline, nursing, the methods used are transferable to research and communication courses in other disciplines.

 

Can’t seem to stop those ads following you around? Why not become ‘metaliterate’?

The Conversation, an online news and opinion site that describes its content as having “academic rigor, journalistic flair,” has met Metaliteracy! First, a bit about The Conversation, for those who may not be familiar with it.

“The Conversation is a collaboration between editors and academics to provide informed news analysis and commentary that’s free to read and republish.”

They describe their mission:

“Access to independent, high-quality, authenticated, explanatory journalism underpins a functioning democracy. Our aim is to allow for better understanding of current affairs and complex issues. And hopefully allow for a better quality of public discourse and conversations.”

They began in Australia, and now have UK, US, and African editions as well.

We were intrigued by the model followed by The Conversation, with the opportunity to share metaliteracy more broadly, and in an open environment. We worked with the outstanding Education Editor, Kalpana Jain, to turn our ideas for a piece into Can’t seem to stop those ads following you around? Why not become ‘metaliterate’?, published on August 7 in the US and Australian editions. Rather than recapping the contents here, we encourage you to take a look at the article, and also the site.  If you fit their criteria for being an author, you might also want to share your expertise with readers of The Conversation!