Advancing Metaliteracy: A Celebration of UNESCO’s Global Media and Information Literacy Week

Trudi Jacobson and Tom Mackey wrote this piece at the invitation of Facet Publishing to celebrate UNESCO’s Global Media and Information Literacy Week. This posting “Advancing Metaliteracy” presents an analysis of the Metaliterate Learner figure within the context of today’s Post-Truth World. Feel free to respond to the ideas presented in the original blog posting or the reposting that appears here at Metaliteracy.org.

 

Facet Publishing

Guest post by Trudi E. Jacobson and Thomas P. Mackey, co-editors of Metaliteracy in Practice and co-authors of Metaliteracy

nathaniel-shuman-396960.jpg Photo by Nathaniel Shuman on Unsplash

In the past year, the term “fake news” first began to be used broadly, as part of the immediate media analysis and critique of the way false information easily circulated during the 2016 Presidential Election. Previously, fake news referred to made-up or distorted news, as evident in the kind of comedy routines we see on TV or read about in satirical publications, either in print or online. But soon thereafter, the term fake news itself was appropriated in a new and more cynical way to attack prominent news sources that countered in any way the narrative of “alternative facts” being presented. Welcome to the “post-truth era” and one of the many literacy challenges we face in today’s connected world. The term “Post-truth” was the topic…

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Metaliteracy Featured as part of ICDE 2017 Panel in Toronto

Members of the Metaliteracy Learning Collaborative participated in the ICDE World Conference for Online Learning Teaching in a Digital Age– Re-thinking Teaching & Learning on Wednesday October 18, 2017. Tom Mackey attended in person and Kelsey O’Brien participated virtually via ZOOM based on a presentation that included contributions from Michele Forte and Trudi Jacobson.

The presentation, entitled Designing for Connectedness and Openness: Advancing Metaliterate Learning through MOOCs and Digital Badging, explored outcomes from the recent paper published by this team in Open Praxis.

Panel presentation at the ICDE World ConferenceThe ICDE 2017 panel presentation was included in the session Badges and Alternative Credentials for Learning and also included Wayne Mackintosh, UNESCO – ICDE Chair in Open Educational Resources, OER Foundation, Burt Lo, Director II of Digital Curriculum & Instructional Technology, Stanislaus County Office of Education, and Alexandra Pickett, Director, Center for Online Teaching Excellence, Open SUNY, State University of New York (SUNY).

New Metaliteracy Article Published in Open Praxis

Members of the Metaliteracy Learning Collaborative have published a new article in the international peer-reviewed journal Open Praxis. Kelsey O’Brien, Michele Forte, Tom Mackey and Trudi Jacobson co-authored Metaliteracy as a Pedagogical Framework for Learner-Centered Design in Three MOOC Platforms: Connectivist, Coursera and Canvas.

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Open Praxis 2017

Open Praxis is an open access journal that is published by the International Council for Open and Distance Education (ICDE). This new research article examines the pedagogical dimensions of metaliteracy in three different MOOC environments, including the original connectivist Metaliteracy MOOC, followed by our Coursera MOOC Empowering Yourself in a Connected World, and the Canvas version, which integrates digital badging,  Empowering Yourself as a Digital Citizen. Metaliteracy is examined in relation to connectivism as a pedagogical model for the development of learner-centered MOOCs that provide the necessary supports for success. We welcome feedback about this new collaborative essay and invite knowledge sharing related to your own MOOC journeys as either teacher or learner.

Metaliteracy Explored at Temple University

As part of the GenEd Faculty Assembly sponsored by the General Education Program at Temple University, Trudi Jacobson and Tom Mackey facilitated a presentation and workshop entitled Metaliteracy and the Participatory Role of Learners in Today’s Social Information EnvironmentThe librarians at Temple University’s Samuel Paley Library facilitated the afternoon breakout sessions (after the eclipse) with faculty from a wide range of disciplines based on the ideas explored during the metaliteracy presentation. The discussion questions are available in this slide deck and could be applied in a variety of settings to spark similar conversations.

Metaliteracy Featured at NOLA 2017

Trudi Jacobson and Tom Mackey participated virtually as part of a panel presentation about metaliteracy and metacognition at the Fourth Annual NOLA Information Literacy Forum, sponsored by the NOLA Information Literacy Collective. In a presentation on August 11 entitled Promoting Metaliteracy and Metacognition in Collaborative Teaching and Learning, Trudi and Tom defined metaliteracy, explored the metaliteracy Learning Goals and Objectives, and discussed metaliteracy competency-based digital badging and metaliteracy MOOCs. The panel also included a learner who participated in the on-demand version of the Coursera Metaliteracy MOOC.

Call for Chapters: Metaliterate Learning for the Post-Truth World

We are soliciting chapter proposals for a book entitled Metaliterate Learning for the Post-Truth World that we will publish in fall 2018 by the American Library Association. We would like to include both theoretical and applied chapters written by academic librarians, disciplinary faculty from a variety of fields, administrators, and instructional designers that describe and reflect upon the importance of advancing metaliteracy in a post-truth world. We see a particular urgency in editing this book at this time when truth itself is questioned for political purposes, journalism and the free press are constantly under attack, science and climate change are doubted as factual, online hacking is prevalent, online privacy is a concern, and the ability to proliferate false information through circuitous social media networks has become a serious issue. It is profoundly clear that the competencies, knowledge, and personal attributes that define metaliteracy and inform the role of the metaliterate learner are critical in today’s connected and divided world: digital literacy and traditional conceptions of information literacy are insufficient for the extreme challenges we currently face.

We would like to like to build on the success of our previous books, Metaliteracy in Practice and Metaliteracy: Reinventing Information Literacy to Empower Learners, while leveraging the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy in Higher Education in relation to teaching and learning in the post-truth world. As one example of this approach, our most recent article for The Conversation, entitled “How can we learn to reject fake news in the digital world?,” applied metaliteracy to the destructive emergence of fake news in the 2016 Presidential Election. We made the argument that we need to read online information with a critical eye, apply metacognitive thinking to the consumption of all information, and make purposeful and meaningful contributions to the social media ecosystem as active participants. Given the interest in metaliteracy as a model for preparing metaliterate learners as responsible participants in today’s divisive information environment, we are especially interested in expanding the conversation to educators who have developed successful metaliteracy teaching and learning theories and practices to resist these challenges. Overall, how do we best prepare our students for being active and engaged metaliterate learners in today’s environment?

The editors are interested in ideas that are easily transferable, and that include strong components of student metacognition and empowerment. The book will include both theoretical arguments for metaliteracy in a post-truth world and innovative case studies that respond to these complex issues, all from different disciplinary perspectives, and academic institutions in the U.S. and internationally. The Metaliteracy Learning Objectives featured in our books and available via Metaliteracy.org: https://metaliteracy.org/learning-objectives/ will be core to the chapters as well.

Tom Mackey, Vice Provost for Academic Programs and Professor at SUNY Empire State College and Trudi E. Jacobson, Distinguished Librarian and Head of the Information Literacy Department at the University at Albany will write the framing chapter and edit this new book.

Please send 1-2 page proposals to Tom at Tom.Mackey@esc.edu no later than September 29, 2017. We will make our decisions by mid October. First drafts of the completed chapters (20-25 pages) will be due on January 12, 2018. Final drafts will be due by April 13, 2018.

If you have any questions about proposal ideas or about the book, please contact Tom at Tom.Mackey@esc.edu or Trudi at tjacobson@albany.edu.

Metaliteracy Keynote Now Online

The recent metaliteracy presentation entitled Metaliteracy as an Empowering Model for Teaching Mobile and Social Learners by Tom Mackey and Trudi Jacobson for an audience at the University of Puerto Rico is now available online. In addition to the PowerPoint slides below, the second half of the presentation was recorded and is available for view via ZOOM in video and audio formats. Thanks to the wonderful audience that participated in this conversation and asked excellent questions!