New Metaliteracy Article Published in Open Praxis

Members of the Metaliteracy Learning Collaborative have published a new article in the international peer-reviewed journal Open Praxis. Kelsey O’Brien, Michele Forte, Tom Mackey and Trudi Jacobson co-authored Metaliteracy as a Pedagogical Framework for Learner-Centered Design in Three MOOC Platforms: Connectivist, Coursera and Canvas.

cover_issue_28_en_US

Open Praxis 2017

Open Praxis is an open access journal that is published by the International Council for Open and Distance Education (ICDE). This new research article examines the pedagogical dimensions of metaliteracy in three different MOOC environments, including the original connectivist Metaliteracy MOOC, followed by our Coursera MOOC Empowering Yourself in a Connected World, and the Canvas version, which integrates digital badging,  Empowering Yourself as a Digital Citizen. Metaliteracy is examined in relation to connectivism as a pedagogical model for the development of learner-centered MOOCs that provide the necessary supports for success. We welcome feedback about this new collaborative essay and invite knowledge sharing related to your own MOOC journeys as either teacher or learner.

Read about another chapter in the forthcoming Metaliteracy in Practice book!

Irene McGarrity of Keene State College introduces you to her chapter in Metaliteracy in Practice, Developing Agency In Metaliterate Learners: Empowerment Through Digital Identity and Participation:

As someone who has been teaching for almost fifteen years, my strongest feelings of accomplishment come from seeing students become empowered to take ownership of their own learning. As academic librarians ourselves become more empowered, we are moving away from the one-shot model, and embracing a “train-the-trainer” model and teaching full-semester classes to facilitate metaliteracy in students. At Keene State College, where the library faculty teach in the Information Studies minor, my colleague, Jennifer Ditkoff, and I designed a course called Digital Identity & Participatory Culture, and taught it in the fall 2014 semester. Our goal was to turn over some of the course to the students, so that they would be making decisions about content, teaching their peers, and designing assignments. In this chapter, I provide background on scholarship in student-centered and collaborative learning, participatory culture, and metaliteracy in higher education, all of which guided us in developing the course. I discuss the challenges and implications of Digital Identity & Participatory Culture, and suggest ways that academic librarians and disciplinary faculty might experiment with student-led content and student-created assignments in their attempt to empower and instill a sense of agency in metaliterate learners.