Video Recording of 2014 IL Summit Keynote

Thanks to Troy Swanson Department Chair and Teaching & Learning Librarian at Moraine Valley Community College for posting the video of our keynote Changing Models, Changing Emphases: The Evolution of Information Literacy at the 2014 IL Summit.  We enjoyed our time at the summit and appreciate this opportunity to share the video.

Metaliteracy Keynote at IL Summit

Last week we presented a collaborative keynote address at the IL Summit at Moraine Valley Community College in Illinois.  The conference was sponsored by DePaul University Library and Moraine Valley Community College Library and focused on the theme Into the Next Generation: The Future of Information Literacy.  We also presented a collaborative workshop entitled Designing Digital Badges to Generate Engaged Learning.  We enjoyed our time at the conference and greatly appreciated the opportunity to engage with all of the participants.  Our keynote examined Changing Models, Changing Emphases: The Evolution of Information Literacy and is available on SlideShare. 

Metaliteracy Book Published by ALA!

Metaliteracy: Reinventing Information Literacy to Empower Learners

New Metaliteracy Book

Our new co-authored book Metaliteracy: Reinventing Information Literacy to Empower Learners (April 2014) has been published by ALA Books/Neal-Schuman!  The book features seven chapters that range from theory to practice, expanding the concept of metaliteracy with an emphasis on metacognition, exploring current trends in social media, describing the learning objectives required to support metaliterate learners, and analyzing global trends in emerging literacies.  We also present the results of a preliminary survey about metaliteracy and related issues, and then close with two case studies from our own teaching in the classroom and online.  The book includes visual models of the metaliteracy framework and the metaliterate learner and several figures in support of our survey chapter.  Sheila A. Webber, Director of the Centre for Information Literacy Research at the Information School, Sheffield University wrote the Foreword to the book.  ALA is currently providing a sample of the book and Facet Publishing is distributing the book internationally.    The new publication is also available via Amazon and other online booksellers.  The official press release from ALA Publishing is available as well: Using Metaliteracy to Empower Learners.  We are excited about the new book and appreciate all of the interest that has been expressed in the metaliteracy model.  We look forward to continuing the conversation now that the book is officially available!  Feel free to post comments about the book via this blog or Twitter using #metaliteracy.  We will be discussing the book as part of our upcoming keynote presentations and can’t wait for the dialogue about these ideas!  -Tom and Trudi

NMC (New Media Consortium) Horizon Report 2014 for Higher Education and Metaliteracy

The NMC Horizon Report 2014 Higher Education Edition has been released, focusing on higher education technology adoption. In this document, they identify 

  • Key trends accelerating higher education technology adoption
  • Significant challenges impeding higher education technology adoption
  • Important developments in educational technology for higher education

Each category includes 6 items, divided into short-, mid-, and longer term time frames. As an example, the key trends that they identify in accelerating higher education technology adoption are:

     One to two years

          the growing ubiquity of social media

          integration of online, hybrid, and collaborative learning

     Three to five years

          rise of data driven learning and assessment

          shift from students as consumers to students as creators

     Five or more years

          agile approaches to change

          evolution of online learning

There are striking connections in this list to metaliteracy. Metaliterate learners will be prepared for, and able to succeed in, situations that develop as a part of these trends. 

The section on important developments in educational technology also includes issues that relate very strikingly to the metaliteracy badging system that is under development, including the flipped classroom (I’ve been using a number of the quests and challenges as outside work for my courses, and this strategy has radically changed both student reception and understanding of the material, and my ability to teach beyond basic concepts) and games and gamification. 

 

Metaliteracy Presentation Videos Now Available via ESC-TV

As part of our SUNY wide Conversations in the Disciplines event hosted at Empire State College, we recorded the keynote presentations and panels. These videos are now available via ESC-TV and include the morning keynote presentation by Tom Mackey and Trudi Jacobson, entitled Developing Metaliterate Learners: Transforming Literacy Across Disciplines.  We also feature the morning Reaction Panel with Richard Fogarty, Carleen Huxley, and Michael Youngs.  The afternoon sessions are also available, including the keynote presentation by Randy B. Hensley and Reaction Panel: Brian Morgan, Paige Jaeger, Tor Loney, Karen Mahar, Dave Brown, and Ashley Smolinski.  All of the videos are available at Metaliteracy Conference 2013.

Metaliteracy Discussed at Westchester Library Association Mid-Winter Conference 2014

Tom Mackey presented on the topic Promoting Access for All with Open and Online Learning at the Westchester Library Association Mid-Winter Conference at The Gateway Center at Westchester Community College.  The theme of this year’s conference explored distance education and also featured Linda Braun, youth services Manager for Seattle Public Library, and keynote speaker Joe Nocera, Op-Ed columnist for the New York Times and commentator for NPR’s Weekend Edition.  The one-day conference featured Linda Braun’s use of Google Hangouts, Tom Mackey’s discussion about open and online learning, MOOCs, OERs, and Metaliteracy and Joe Nocera’s keynote about digital privacy.   This is the complete PowerPoint presentation by Tom Mackey:

Metaliteracy MOOC Talk Plenary

We launched Metaliteracy MOOC on September 4 at the University at Albany with colleagues from SUNY Empire State College and the University Libraries. Our opening plenary was facilitated through Blackboard Collaborate and included Tom Mackey, Trudi Jacobson, Tor Loney, Jenna Hecker, Nicola Marae Allain, and our colleagues from the Metaliteracy Learning Collaborative Michele Forte, Kathleen Stone, Mike Daly, and Mark McBride. We were joined in person by three UAlbany students and online by one of our graduate students from Empire State College. The first MOOC Talk was developed in Prezi and provided an overview of key metaliteracy terms, updates on recent metaliteracy activity, and two figures from the Metaliteracy manuscript recently completed by Tom Mackey and Trudi Jacobson for ALA Books. A recording of our first interactive session via Blackboard Collaborate is available at our Topic 1 page at Metaliteracy MOOC. In the spirit of Open SUNY we coordinated shared press releases that have been published at the Empire State College web site and the UAlbany Web site. The live MOOC Talk session was fascinating for us as we facilitated the talk with several presenters, allowing us to look at metaliteracy from multiple perspectives. We were also inspired by the post-MOOC Talk (that we did not record) because it allowed us to talk through the MOOC format itself and it felt very much like a spontaneous seminar about MOOCs. We have also seen an asynchronous conversation unfold via Twitter at #metaliteracy in response to the talk. We look forward to our upcoming MOOC Talks. On September 18 Char Booth will examine “The Metacognitive Dimension of Metaliteracy,” a key aspect of the metaliteracy model.

Metaliteracy in the Disciplines

Michele Forte, Trudi Jacobson, and Emer O’Keefe were successful in applying for a State University of New York (SUNY) Conversations in the Disciplines about metaliteracy.  This intercampus one-day conference entitled “Developing Metaliterate Learners: Transforming Literacy Across Disciplines” will take place at the Center for Distance Learning (CDL) at Empire State College on Friday, December 13, 2013.

Learners – students and educators alike – are no longer simply information consumers but information producers in a participatory social media environment. Learners increasingly work collaboratively, creating and sharing digital information. We need to be adaptable within an information landscape that is complex and ever-changing. The metaliteracy model emphasizes these evolving literacy concepts, as well as the critical role played by metacognitive components, but many disciplines still view information creation as something done solely through traditional means, and solely by scholars in the field. How might disciplines benefit from new and collaborative modes of information creation? Can traditional models resist the changes wrought by Web 2.0? How might a conversation about expanding these conceptions bring new and fruitful ideas to these fields of study?

Librarians have ample opportunities to learn new theories and methods connected to information literacy in all its guises, but rarely have the chance to engage in macro discussion with disciplinary faculty members about the changes to the intersections of their fields. Usually conversations center around a specific class period, and what the librarian will teach to the professor’s students.

This day of conversation will allow members of both groups to engage together in learning and discussion about cutting-edge topics surrounding metaliteracy, the information literacy of today’s information and technology environment.

Tom Mackey and Trudi Jacobson will provide the keynote presentation to launch the event. Randy Hensley, Head of Information Services at Newman Library, Baruch College, CUNY, will be the afternoon keynote speaker, focusing on the student perspective. There will also be morning and afternoon reactions panels, with librarians and faculty members from community colleges, 4-year schools, a university, and a BOCES participating.

Registration will open shortly, and preference will be given to pairs made up of a librarian and a faculty member in a discipline who plan to attend together.

Meta or MEGA literacy!

Metaliteracy has been featured recently in two new publications.  A new UNESCO document entitled Media and Information Literacy for Knowledge Societies (2013) provides a brief definition of metaliteracy and makes it central to the conclusion.  According to this new publication:

As an umbrella term, it covers many of the other literacies. It also seems to overlap with new literacies such as multiliteracies and global literacy. It is a metaliteracy. It is transversal in its nature and can be seen as an iceberg concept which is much bigger than what it is seen at first sight. Information literacy can be easily called a megaliteracy which is composed of many other skills and literacies (p. 85).

As a comprehensive and unifying metaliteracy, the idea of a megaliteracy is not needed, since the the meta already encompasses this idea.  But this is an intriguing way to look at it and certainly addresses the interconnected nature of emerging literacies.  Great to see metaliteracy brought into the conversation.

We also note another new publication from Betty Hurley-Dasgupta, Carol Yeager, and Catherine Bliss from SUNY Empire State College about the first MOOC they offered in the SUNY System entitled Creativity and Multicultural Communication.  The authors make several references to metaliteracy in their article cMOOC and Global Learning: An Authentic Alternative in The Journal of Asynchronous Learning Networks (JALN).  According to the authors,

Clearly, we need to scaffold the development of metaliteracy skills for learning through cMOOCs. Some scaffolding could be accomplished by incorporating more self-assessment into the MOOC. For future MOOCs, we plan to incorporate shared rubrics to help participants assess their own metaliteracy skills, (Yeager, et.al, 2013, p. 144).

This is an important point that demonstrates the potential impact of a metaliteracy perspective on the cMOOC learning experience, and how learners could gain new insights and knowledge in these open and collaborative spaces.  We definitely need metaliteracy rubrics for MOOCs to enhance the experience for independent and collaborative learners.

Metaliteracy Presentation at ACRL 2013

Tom Mackey and Trudi Jacobson will present this week at ACRL 2013, the Association of College & Research Libraries Conference in Indianapolis, Indiana. The presentation entitled “What’s in a Name?: Information Literacy, Metaliteracy, or Transliteracy” will explore metaliteracy in relation to other emerging literacy frameworks as well as the metacognitive dimension of the term.  Trudi and Tom will also report out on the progress of the SUNY Innovative Instruction Technology Grant (IITG) that established a metaliteracy learning collaborative and developed new metaliteracy learning objectives (available at this blog) with SUNY colleagues.  Follow our Twitter feed during the conference at #acrlname